Tag Archives: Welschriesling

A new name for the Riesling pretender?

Olaszrizling is Hungary’s most widely planted white variety. Its name often leads to confusion as it can be translated as Italian Riesling. However, the variety is not Italian nor is it related to Riesling as far as we know. Indeed sometimes Hungarians simply refer to it as Rizling, which admittedly I find rather confusing. Riesling is known here as Rajni (Rhine) Riesling.olaszrizling_1

Three Balaton winemakers’ associations have decided to try to put an end to this confusion, especially as regards export markets. The Balatoni Kör (Balaton Circle), Rizling Generation and Csopaki Kódex are part of an initiative seeking a new name in Hungary for the variety. Although interestingly, the Italians call it Riesling Italico, it is known as Welschriesling in German-speaking countries (it’s grown widely in Austria) and Graševina in Croatia, by which it is referenced in ‘Wine Grapes’. As Hungarians generally consider this a Hungarian variety, many felt somewhat snubbed when Graševina was the name selected for use in this mighty reference tome.

Of course, you can’t just change the name as you wish, any new name has to be approved by the International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV) headquartered in Switzerland.

So, what names are on the table?

Oris – This name reflects its current name of Olaszrizling, i.e. a merging of the two words.

Nemes – This name aims to identify the variety as a noble variety, not a mass wine, which many consider it to be, given that it is often sold as bulk wine for very low prices. In northern Europe, it also has the reputation of being rather poor quality due to large quantities of Yugoslavian Laski Rizling exported under communism. Although the variety is capable of producing attractive, concentrated wines if the yields are controlled. The word nemes means noble in Hungarian.

Mandola – This name probably refers to the almond note which is one of the typical flavour and aroma characteristics of Olaszrizling.

So the race is on for a new Hungarian name for the variety. But what about the name Welschriesling, which also contains the word Riesling? English speakers will often refer to the variety by this name too and then it gives the impression it is from Wales, i.e. Welsh Riesling. However, Welsch doesn’t actually mean Welsh in German, it means Latin, Southern European or foreign. Welsh is actually Walisisch in German. But now perhaps I’m being over picky.

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Csopaki Kódex

Hewlett-PackardThe last masterclass of the day was related to Csopak, which is part of the Balatonfüred-Csopak wine district. This part of the wine district consists of the villages of Csopak, Paloznak, Lovas, Alsóörs and Felsőörs.

In the past, the main grape varieties to be found around the Balaton were Szigeti (a.k.a. Furmint) and Kadarka. Sixty percent of plantings were black varieties, whereas nowadays white varieties dominate, although there is no one grape variety closely associated with any of the wine districts or indeed the Balaton wine region itself.csopk_piramis_honlap_trükk

Csopak is trying to change this; in fact, it has long been associated with Olaszrizling and in an attempt to create a clear identity for itself, in 2012 it created something called the Csopaki Kódex (Csopak Codex) and the first year when it was applied to the wines was 2013. This is a kind of ‘quality pyramid’ for wines produced in any vineyards of the five villages which make up Csopak. The wine must be dry Olaszrizling and it must meet certain criteria in order to be able to display the Csopaki Kódex label.

The Kódex is a three-level pyramid. The lowest level is Csopak Körzet, which is generic wine from Csopak, so a kind of ‘Csopak villages’ – wine can come from any of the five villages. The next level up is VND Csopak ‘premier cru’ – here the wine has to come from 26 ‘premier cru’ vineyard areas (dülő). The top level is VNDC Csopak where the wine is then vineyard selected.

In order to qualify for the Kódex, the wines have to meet certain criteria relating to yields, residual sugar, filtering, acidity, aroma profile and alcohol level (12-13%). It should also have been aged at least six months in oak/tank and three in bottle.

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The wine should be bottled in Burgundy style bottles, closed with a quality cork and black capsule, and bear the Kódex sticker.

The aroma profile of the wines should feature almond and rhubarb and mineral notes from the soils, which in Csopak are dolomite, marl and red sandstone.

Since 2013, the number of registered growers has risen from eleven to fourteen.

We got to taste wines from the following registered vineyards: Szent Donát Birtok, Petrányi Pince, Guden Birtok, Koralevits Pince, Jásdi Pince and Fekete Pince.