Category Archives: Budapest

La Parilla

Once upon a time, in my former life as an English teacher, I used to teach at a bank on the corner of Szabadság tér in Budapest. Opposite the main entrance was a very sorry-looking building – blackened walls, held up by equally blackened wooden scaffolding.

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Szabadság tér is one of my favourite squares in Budapest, a large, open expanse, surrounded by magnificent buildings, thankfully now mostly in a good state of repair. KI_B6849-HDREven this derelict black building has been brought back to life and is now occupied by the luxury IBEROSTAR Grand Hotel, which opened in October 2016. An independent restaurant, La Parilla, now operates on the ground floor. It has an elegant red, black and beige interior designed by a Spanish designer and from April you’ll also be able to enjoy its terrace with a great view of my favourite square.

The food on offer is mostly Mediterranean style, but they also have great steak or DSC_3479mangalica and Hungarian food, as well as an impressive dessert menu.

A couple of weeks ago, I had the chance to taste a selection of the wines from their 100-strong wine list, featuring both Hungarian and international wines and to sample the cuisine of chefs Peter Szabó and Balázs Papp.

Wines tasted:

AnDSC_3499na de Codorniu Rosé Brut / Spain, Penedés

Anna de Codorniu Rosé Brut is the rosé version of Codorniu’s most iconic sparkling wine.

Elegant and subtle, made from 70% Pinot Noir and 30% Chardonnay. A fresh wine with cherry and strawberry notes and a fine mousse.

Gizella Barát Hárslevelű 2015DSC_3776

A vineyard selection from the Barát vineyard in Tokaj.

A rich, broad yet lively wine with intensive varietal flavours of tropical fruits, mango, lemon and lime.  It’s spicy with plenty of mineral notes and a long finish.

Bodegas Faustino, Rioja, Spain, Faustino VII white 2015

Pure Viura, aka Macabeo, better known for use in Cava.

Crisp and spicy with apple, peach and delicate, floral notes. Tangy on the palate with rich fruit and a fresh finish.

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Bott Frigyes, Rajnai Rizling 2015

A special wine using only eight tiny clusters per vine, selected in three tries, whole bunch pressing followed by spontaneous fermentation in barrel. Owing to the perfect vintage and biodynamic cultivation, it required only light filtering and no fining.

A wonderful wine, initially a little reserved, it opens up nicely to reveal a rich, floral, herbal and apricot nose with plenty of minerality.  Crisp and elegant. A wine to be savoured.

Masi, Veneto, Italy, Masi Masianco 2015

A winery better known for its Amarone, a dry red wine made from the red varieties used to create Valpolicella. This white is also made from partially dried Pinot Grigio and Trebbiano grapes.

Restrained but opens to show attractive tropical fruit aromas. Palate is a little chalky and strangely earthy but fills out on the mid-palate allowing the fruit to blend with a touch of honey. Finishes dry with a citrus twist.

DSC_3781Vida Öreg Tőkék Kadarkája 2015

Kadarka is the oldest grape variety in the historic wine region of Szekszárd and these vines date back to 1996-7. Kadarka is a thin-skinned variety, thus sensitive to the weather, so this is not made every year.

Light and elegant with a wonderful spicy nose. Soft but characteristic flavour of red fruits on the palate should be a real crowd-pleaser.

Heimann Barbár 2013

This wine, made by one of the most prominent winemakers in Szekszárd is named after a DSC_3759composition by Béla Bártok, the famous Hungarian composer. It’s made from a blend of Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Tannat and Kékfrankos.

A dense nose followed by a vibrant palate of sour cherry, fruits of the forest, blackcurrant and dark chocolate coated prune. A youthful wine that’s both taut and flavoursome, but with still slightly grippy tannins.

Faustino I Gran Reserva 2004

Produced from Rioja’s typical grapes of Tempranillo, Graciano and Mazuelo.

Intense, bright cherry red colour. Aromatic and complex, with notes of tobacco, cedar and leather against a background of ripe fruit, jam and spices. On the palate, powerful yet velvety, with flavours of rich red fruit, liquorice and minerals with smooth, ripe tannins with some spice and vanilla on the medium finish.

Peter Lehmann, Barossa, Australia, Futures Shiraz 2012

This is the winery’s top wine. Is named in honour of how Peter financed his winery – when he wanted to start making wine, he didn’t have sufficient capital, so, he asked people to pay in advance for his wines. Enough people seem to have trusted him and he’s still going strong today!

The wine is matured in French oak to integrate the intense, spicy fruit flavours, resulting in an approachable and supple wine. Deep red-black colour with a nose loaded with spicy plum and chocolate notes. The palate is firm and rich with a long finish, a legacy of the low yielding vineyards of the north-west Barossa.

HDSC_3779oldvölgy Exaltation 2012

Awarding winning dessert wine made from 100% Sárgamuskotály from the Nyúlaszó vineyard in Tokaj.

Luscious wine with floral aromas and notes of peach, honey, rose and lychee.

With our wines, we were served a selection of dishes including a blue cheese tart, olive jelly, breaded pork with homemade ajvar, and toast with chickpea and octopus cream.  Avocado and chocolate mouse and a mango tart kept those with a sweet tooth happy.

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La Parilla is open from 7 am for breakfast, there is a weekly lunch menu and you can dine until midnight. I was impressed by both the food and the wines on offer. Although, admittedly, the Hungarian wines we tried won the day for me. So, if you are in the vicinity of Szabadság tér, it comes recommended, especially once the terrace opens and you can look out on the square.

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Junibor members present their new wines

On 16 November, Junibor members presented their new wines to guests at the DiVino Gozsdu wine bar in Budapest.

mtszl_ff-9215Junibor, the Hungarian Association of Young Winemakers, was formed in 2008 to bring together young winemakers and create a community helping to provide professional development for the next generation of winemakers. Junibor members have to be talented young winemakers aged under 35 when they are chosen and can only remain in the association until they are 40. They are very often the offspring of another generation of prominent winemakers. They currently have around 30 members from 11 wine regions in Hungary.

mtszl_ff-9310.JPGIts history has been intertwined with the DiVino chain of winebars, the first one opening facing St Stephen’s Basilica in 2011, with the aim of offering only Hungarian wines, including the best wines of the Junibor members. The chain has grown over the last five years, with new locations opening in Győr and the Gozsdu Udvár in Budapest, which offers 120 wines by the glass, and was where the tasting was held.

mtszl_ff-9133Zsolt Gere from Villány showed an attractive youthful Muscat Ottonel using bought-in grapes and his Marton Napi Újbor, a Portugieser. The Portugieser was not a light wine, like usual, but a thicker wine with more tannins, yet elegant and playful. The bunches had been big with large grapes and there had been a couple of shrivelled grapes in each bunch. It saw no oak, went through malo and was then bottled, bright, fruity and fresh. He admitted that it had been a difficult year, with spring frost, and they had been happy to save the grapes. Their Cab Franc, Sauvignon and Merlot should be capable of producing premium wines, whereas the others will probably fall into the good category.

Peti Frittmann from Kunság brought along an aromatic Irsai Oliver, which was light and mtszl_ff-9148balanced and a Neró rosé. The grapes for this had been harvested early and resulted in a very floral rosé with plenty of red fruit and rose. Peti said that the cool year had contributed to the intensity of the aromas and the retention of acidity. He also produced a rosé blend from Medina and Zweigelt, which was fresh, crisp and fruity. The reds that they were able to harvest later were good too, he said, also maintaining a good level of acidity.

mtszl_ff-9279Tomi Kovács from Szent Donat in Csopak had a pair of vineyard-selected wines. A Kódex Olaszrizling from the Slikker vineyard, fermented partly in oak and partly in stainless steel, very attractive fresh wine with good acidity, lingering minerality and almond notes on the finish. The other wine was a Furmint from the Márga vineyard, partly aged in pyrogranite bowls, which he tells me, are a little like concrete eggs, allowing the wine to breathe, thus micro-oxidise, as if it were in oak but imparting no influence and so allowing the grape and terroir to shine through. Certainly the Furmint demonstrated excellent varietal purity and lovely minerality from the Márga soils. He said that they had experienced a lot of hail and had not even been able to harvest anything in some vineyards, although they had managed to save about 30-40% in Slikker. The harvest took place three weeks later than usual, and the quality was excellent where there had not been any hail.

Flóra Jekl from Villány poured a Primo rosé made from Kadarka, Pinot Noir and Syrah. Fresh and fruity, a bit tutti frutti with a touch of spice. She told me that she would also make a gyöngyöző (lightly sparkling) wine from this. Her Portugieser was light and fruity with fresh acidity.

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Tomi Kis from Somló brought along a Somlói Juhfark from the Gróf vineyard, an attractive nutty wine with plenty of yellow fruit and minerality. Tomi reported that they had suffered more than 60% damage due to hail, and the result will be a small quantity of good wines. To make matters worse, they waited until the last minute to harvest, and then the birds came!

Ákos Kamocsay presented wines from the mtszl_ff-9200.JPGMór wine region. A Rhine Riesling, still cloudy and young, that will be bottled next year, so very much a sample. The Chardonnay, also a sample, is being aged in 500l used oak and will spend 8-12 months in barrel on its lees and then go into stainless steel. Quite smoky and toasty with plenty of fruit along with zippy acidity and perhaps a touch of tannins. He said that Mór had also experienced a mixed year, afflicted by both frost and hail, but those who had not suffered damage had harvested good, healthy grapes.

As usual, Csabi Miklós was surrounded by a gaggle of admirers, so it was rather difficult to mtszl_ff-9164.JPGexchange any words with him, but he conjured up a barrel sample of his Demi Moor Királyleányka, which with lovely peach fruit and a touch of residual sugar, he said was intended to be a gastro and festival wine. His Ezerjó, the key wine of the Mór region, was fresh, lemony and appley with a touch of residual sugar and some saltiness on the finish.

mtszl_ff-9196.JPGDóri Bussay from the Zala region had a barrel sample of her Pinot Noir, still displaying some yeasty notes. The aim here, she says, is to have a fresh, fruity wine, so it will move barrels frequently. They were lucky and only had about four vines affected by frost as they are on a plain rather than in a valley, and the hail there came with rain, thus not much loss. The wine exhibited nice cherry fruit, was quite full bodied, with smooth tannins. It will have 8-10 months in oak and 2 months in bottle before release next August.

Csaba Vesztergombi had a Királyleányka, bottled that day, attractive and balanced, with mtszl_ff-9247.JPGplenty of stone fruit, very drinkable. He also showed a Pinot Noir rosé, gaining its colour simply from being pressed. Fresh, attractive fruit, elegant, bright and very quaffable.

Tomi Hérnyak from Etyek brought along a Sauvignon Blanc, which generally does well in Etyek due to its cooler climate, and displayed lovely varietal character, although still a bit yeasty. Tomi says that they can make good varietals and aromatic whites this year in Etyek. The autumn was hot and sunny, which was a saving grace after the earlier part of the year. He also had a late-harvested Zöldveltini, which had lovely citrus flavours of lime and lemon and some green peppercorns. Balanced, spicy and with good acidity.

mtszl_ff-9324.JPGBence Dúzsi from Szekszárd had a rosé from Blauburger, Portugieser and Zweigelt. Pale, attractive fruit, restrained on nose, but more intense on palate. Fresh and very quaffable, with perhaps a spritz of CO2. The red estate wine (Birtokbor) of 50% Kékfrankos, Cab Franc, Sauvignon, Merlot and some Pinot Noir aimed to show the winery’s characteristic varieties, and was rich and fruity with a hint of toasty oak.

Andi Gere from Villány had DiVino branded Irsai Oliver, light, summery and aromatically fragrant, and a rosé from Kékfrankos, Merlot, Portugieser and Pinot Noir, restrained and elegant, but with enough bright fruit to balance the fresh acidity. She also had a barrel sample of Portugieser, which will spend a further three months in oak. Attractive fruit and some toast and coffee, but with just a touch of bitterness and slightly flabby acidity.

Angelika Árvay of Tokaj had a Sauvignon Blanc which had only been harvested on 26 September. The grapes were bought-in, but they did the harvest themselves. It has only seen stainless steel and will hopefully be bottled in January or February. Attractive varietal character and lovely fresh acidity. A tank sample of Sárga Muskotály was the last wine. It needed lots of aeration as it was very yeasty, but some lovely grapey aromas shone through, with a touch of salt and some residual sugar.

The crowds were now building up, so it was time to head off, but all in all an impressive collection of still very young wines.

(Photos courtesy of Junibor and Árpád Pintér)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wining and Dining in Budapest

Elizabeth’s gastronomic experiences around Budapest

Elizabeth Gabay MW

One of the perks of judging at international wine competitions, such as VinAgora, is that the hosts put on a programme for the judges to showcase local wine, gastronomy and culture. This has several purposes.

The judges get to know each other – which in an international competition is an achievement in itself. The languages amongst the judges included: Hungarian, Romanian, Czech, Croat, Bulgarian, French, German, English, Spanish, Greek, Portuguese, Italian, Polish… Between us, most managed in French or English, with the few polyglots translating for those without a common language.

Vinagora judges The judges and organisers of Vinagora 2015

The gastronomic and cultural programme also acts as a form of promotion for the host country. When the competition is based in a wine producing area, this involves visits to vineyards. As Christine Collins, organiser of five varietal competitions in Alsace, said, her competitions are structured to encourage judges to stay in the region either before…

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Tokaj Grand 2015

tokaj_grand_logoA unique opportunity to try all the Tokaj wine region has to offer is coming up in Budapest shortly.

Tokaj Grand’ will take place on 28 March at the five-star Corinthia Hotel. It is being organised for the first time by Winelovers and promises to be a remarkable event.

Most people are familiar with Tokaj because of the sweet, botrytised aszú wines. However, kesei_szuretelesu_furtTokaj also produces some fabulous dry whites and some late harvest wines too. Tokaj Grand will give you the chance try some of these as well as the more famous aszú.

In addition to the opportunity to walk around and try the wines (over 200!) of more than seventy producers, if your Hungarian mesterkurzus_foto_graselly_balazsis up to it, you could also choose to attend one of the eight thematic masterclasses on offer during the day. Of course, you could just go along to the classes in order to try some great wines in a more relaxed environment! You’ll need to buy tickets for these in advance though.

Choose from themes such as:

  • Dry Tokaj wines and their international rivals
  • Mádi Kör selection
  • Disznókö 5 Puttonyos aszú vertical tasting
  • Szepsy masterclass
  • Tokaj Kereskedőház masterclass (in English)
  • Wine, intoxication…Bénye
  • Tokaji autumn
  • Mindszent Havi Mulatság

See you there!

Furmint Február

Going to a major wine-tasting event with still relatively blocked sinuses is not really conducive to sniffing and t2015-02-05 15.43.20asting ability. However, it is Furmint Február and this also means the annual Nagy Furmint Február Kóstoló held at the scenic Vajdahunyadvár in Városliget, so I gave it my best shot.

Seventy-nine producers from around Hungary and across the border were offering up their wines for our delectation. With five hours to taste, not much chance of trying them all, but I managed to taste a fair few – from around thirty producers, mostly from Tokaj or Somló, but also one or two from elsewhere, such as Eger. Dulled senses prevented me from being overly analytical, but still got a good impression of the quality and range of wines on offer.

I didn’t really taste any of the sweet and aszús, concentrating mainly on the dry and off-dry offerings.

Some highlights:

A 2013 blend from Bott Frigyes, Super Granum, which included not only Furmint but also Hárslevelű and Juhfark. The Juhfark had been macerated on its skins for four days giving it notes reminiscent of szamorodni or orange wine. Delicious.

A fruity, crisp mineral Kikelet 2013 Váti Furmint.

A rich, fruity, honeyed off-dry 2009 Csontos Furmint from Bott Pince bursting with ripe stone fruit.

The interestingly named 2013 Furmintage from Portius – a mouthful of minerally peach, quince and tinned pear.

The concentrated and complex Demetervin Király Furmint 2013, produced exclusively from grapes harvested from the Király dülő’s upper slopes.

If you missed out on the ‘Grand Tasting’ and want to get stuck into some Furmint, there are still plenty of other Furmint-related events happening in February – http://www.furmintfebruar.hu/hu/programok/ (only in Hungarian – the English does not appear to work).

Fröccs for beginners

Fröccs

Summer finally seems to have come, if today is any indication at all. So, unless you are a hardened wine snob, it is time to move onto the more refreshing ‘fröccs’ while you are soaking up the sun on the terrace or in the ‘romkocsma’.

Fröccs (pronounced frerch, to rhyme with perch) is the Hungarian for wine spritzer. Most languages generally have one word to describe this drink, e.g. in German ‘Weinschorle’, in English ‘wine spritzer’, and more or less one way of making it. Hungarian, however, being the complicated language of a complex people, has a myriad of terms to describe the full range of fröccs available.

Let’s start with the easiest ones, that is the most commonly drunk ones. So, you can have either a ‘kis fröccs’ or a ‘nagy fröccs’, that is a small or a big one. What does that actually mean? Well the kis fröccs is 1dl (that’s 100ml to you and me) wine to 1dl soda water. The nagy fröccs is 2dl wine to 1dl soda. All well and good, now comes the ‘hosszúlépés’, good if you’re a bit more thirsty or it’s too early in the day for any serious drinking. This is 1dl wine to 2dl soda.

If your friends are drinking pints of beer and you don’t want to be waiting around with an empty glass until they finish up, then your tipple of choice has to be the ‘viceházmester’, which weighs in at 2dl wine to 3dl soda. Find that a bit watery, then try the slightly stronger ‘házmester’, just reverse the volumes.

Need to rehydrate after running to the bar? Well then, have a ‘sportfröccs’, 1dl wine and 4dl soda. Or needing to catch up after the others have had a headstart? You could knock back a quick ‘háziúr’ (4dl wine to 1dl soda).

Of course, some of these have several names, which I won’t bore you with. Unless you speak Hungarian, you’ll neither be able to say them or to understand what they mean anyway.

After this we move into the realms of the sublime and ridiculous. The volume is upped to a litre. So, actually probably quite good for the Sziget when you don’t want to keep having to stand in a queue to get a top up.

Choose from:

Magyar-angol (Hungarian – English) or puskás fröccs – 6dl wine to 3dl soda – you have to know something about football to understand this one. A Hungarian football fan will no doubt be very pleased to explain this one to you! An English fan probably won’t want to hear the explanation.

Távolugrás – 1dl wine to 9dl soda
Polgármester – 6dl wine to 4dl soda
Apolgármester – 4dl wine to 6dl soda
Avasi fröccs – 7dl wine to 3 dl soda
Krúdy fröccs – 9dl wine to 1 dl soda
Mafla – 5dl wine to 5dl soda

A few more variations of even larger volumes or different ’mixers’ exist, including, to my mind quite revoltingly, cola, but strangely, there does not seem to be a 2-8 or 8-2 variation. I wonder whether this is deliberate or simply an oversight.

The other consideration is, of course, what colour fröccs to have – fehér (white), rozé or vörös (red)
You could then also perk up your fröccs with a drop of elderflower (in white wine) or lavendar (in rose) cordial. Just a drop though, or you’ll end up with some sickly sweet concoction resembling a flavoured Babycham.

So time to get out to the bar and try out your newfound fröccs knowledge.

Egészségedre!

Of course, being a wine snob, I shouldn’t really be drinking watered down wine. Never mind. Make sure it’s the good stuff rather than the folyó bor (house wine).